WoundCon Spring 2022 Agenda

Download the WoundCon Spring 2022 Conference Planning Guide or view the Agenda below.

Friday March, 11 2022

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8:00AM – 9:00AM EST

Auditorium

Treatment Algorithms for the Care of Burns

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Paul M. Glat, MD, FACS

Burns are a major public health concern, with injuries ranging from mild to life-threatening. Although they share similarities with any wound a clinician might treat, they also present unique challenges. Through real-world burn
cases, this session will examine key elements in caring for patients’ burns.

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8:00AM – 9:00AM EST

Auditorium

Dressed to the Nines — Calcium Alginate Top Tips

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Catherine T. Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Alginate wound dressings are non-woven, non-adhesive pads and ribbons composed of natural polysaccharide fibers or xerogel derived from seaweed. On contact with exudate, these dressings form a moist gel through a process of ion exchange. First in the Deep Dive into Dressings series, this session will provide a case-based examination of the wound types best suited for the use of calcium alginates and tips and tricks to optimize their effectiveness.

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8:00AM – 9:00AM EST

Auditorium

On the Cutting Edge: Surgical Site Infection Prevention and Management

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Karen Ousey, PhD, FRSB, RGN, FHEA, CMgr MCMI

Surgical site infections (SSIs) are an ever-increasing phenomenon worldwide due to various factors. SSI morbidity
and mortality are often significant, and their surgical or medical management is often complex. Improved
guidelines and strategies for managing at-risk patients can support clinicians’ efforts to reduce the risk of SSI
development. This session will also underscore the importance of wound management including frequent wound
cleaning, appropriate dressings, dressing changes and patient education.

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9:00AM – 10:00AM EST

Auditorium

The Role of Micronized Purified Flavonoid Fractions as Part of Standard of Care for Management of Venous Leg Ulcers: The Published Data

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

M. Mark Melin, MD

Flavonoids are the most abundant bioactive compounds all around the world and are emerging as an important
source of new wound healing therapies. Most wound healing medicinal plants possess multiple flavonoids
that act synergistically or collectively. Flavonoids also have venotonic and lymphotonic properties and act on
leukocytes and endothelium, resulting in decreased inflammation and permeability. This session will examine
and evaluate published data related to the role of micronized purified flavonoid fractions (MPFF/diosmin/
hesperidin) as part of standard of care for management of venous leg ulcers.

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9:00AM – 10:00AM EST

Auditorium

Heel Ulcers, Diabetic Ulcers or Pressure Injuries: What’s in a Name?

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Jayesh Shah, MD, MHA

The establishment of a correct diagnosis is relative to established guidelines and reinforces all subsequent
therapeutic activity. Complications can arise when nomenclatures overlap, as is the case with diabetic foot
ulceration, heel ulceration and pressure injuries on the foot occurring in people with diabetes. In such cases,
clinicians must ensure that patients receive a care plan that aligns both the wound causation and the underlying
pathology. Patient care can then be optimized to include appropriate assessments, management, and general
foot and skin care.

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12:00PM – 1:00PM EST

Auditorium

Evidence-Based Prevention and Management of Diabetic Foot Problems

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Andrew J. M. Boulton, MD, DSC (HON), FACP, FRCP

According to data from the World Health Organization, lower extremity complications of diabetes are a top 10
contributor to the disability burden worldwide. Evidence suggests that adhering to evidence-based guidelines can
significantly reduce the incidence of diabetes-related lower extremity complications. This session will illustrate the
importance of prompt and appropriate evidence-based management of diabetic foot ulcers, including local wound
care, use of mechanical offloading, treatment of infection and indications for revascularization.

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12:00PM – 1:00PM EST

Auditorium

Managing Wound Complications after Breast Reconstruction

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Helen Gelly, MD, FACCWS, FUHM, UHM/ABPM

Patients and clinicians are frequently confronted with wound complications after breast reconstruction, such as surgical site infections, seromas, wound dehiscence and wound necrosis. These complications possess a diverse etiology, and, therefore, management necessitates a multifactorial approach. This session will provide decisionmaking guidelines for operative and non-operative interventions including the use of negative pressure wound therapy, acellular dermal dressings, advanced wound dressings and hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

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12:00PM – 1:00PM EST

Auditorium

Are You in for a Shock? The Role of Electrical Stimulation in Wound Healing

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Rose Hamm, PT, DPT, CWS, FACCWS

Dubbed the endogenous “skin battery,” the wound healing process is influenced by our skin’s endogenous electric potential. In undamaged skin, a natural electrical potential of 10–60 mV between the epidermal and subepidermal layer exists. Conversely, transepithelial voltage fundamentally increases around a wound, producing a voltage difference between the wound site and the undamaged skin ranging from 100 to 150 mV/mm. These endogenous electrical fields play an essential role in wound healing, with resulting endogenous currents acting as a signal for cellular migration that in tandem help heal wounds. This phenomenon motivates the exploration into the use of electrical stimulation (ES). This session explores the effects of ES on the cellular mechanisms of wound healing and the usefulness of ES in treating acute and chronic wounds.

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2:30PM – 3:30PM EST

Auditorium

Under Pressure — Avoiding Complications with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Kara Couch, MS, CRNP, CWS

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) involves the application of local subatmospheric pressure to a wound. It is widely used in skin defects, active infection and surgical reconstruction. Because NPWT is a valuable and dynamic tool in the treatment of many types of wounds, clinicians should have a heightened awareness of potential pitfalls that may impair its use. This session will examine five pitfalls of NPWT use and how to avoid them.

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2:30PM – 3:30PM EST

Auditorium

Surgical Offloading for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Alton Johnson Jr., DPM, CWSP

When conservative offloading options have failed and patients are at risk of limb loss, surgical offloading may provide an option to decrease healing time, reduce recurrence rates, and remove or reduce deformities in the patient with diabetes. In a case-based format, this session will delve into decision-making on when surgical intervention for the diabetic foot should be considered and operative techniques for offloading ulcers.

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2:30PM – 3:30PM EST

Auditorium

Preoperative Care of the Ostomy Patient — Preventing Stoma-Related Complications

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

April Lumpkins, MSN, AGACNP-BC, CWOCN, CFCN

An intestinal ostomy is an artificial bowel opening created on the skin, the complications of which can be associated with significant morbidity. Complications — including infection, parastomal abscess, hernia, dermatological conditions, stoma necrosis, stenosis, retraction and prolapse — negatively affect the quality of life of ostomates. Available data suggests that preoperative care and education by wound and ostomy therapists significantly reduce early stoma-related complications. In contrast, a lack of preoperative care was found to be a significant risk factor in problematic stomas. This session will provide approaches for preoperative care in patients undergoing ostomy surgery to reduce the burden of stoma-related complications.

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5:30PM – 6:30PM EST

Auditorium

Adipose Tissue Transplantation and Its Role in Wound Healing

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Edward Gronet, MD

Adipose tissue, once considered a simple inert tissue functioning as insulation and energy storage, is now seen as one of the largest endocrine organs in the body, containing a variety of cell types, with potential applications for regenerative medicine. The adipose-derived stem cells found in fat grafts are hypothesized to aid in wound healing by means of differentiation into fibroblasts and keratinocytes and the release of pro-healing growth factors. This session will investigate the promising potential of autologous fat grafting in wound healing.

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5:30PM – 6:30PM EST

Auditorium

Let Food Be Thy Medicine — Implications of Nutrition and DFU Management Consensus

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Maritza Molina, RDN

Nutrition is a critical component of the wound healing process but is not often the first thing clinicians consider when treating patients with a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). In this context, nutrition plays a key role in immune function, malnutrition, glycemic control, and weight loss and weight maintenance. This session will provide an overview of a consensus and guidance for nutrition interventions in adults with diabetic foot ulcers.

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5:30PM – 6:30PM EST

Auditorium

The Wound Bed Preparation Paradigm

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

R. Gary Sibbald, BSc, MD, FRCPC (Med, Derm), MACP, FAAD, MEd, FAPWCA, D.Sc. (Hons)

Wound bed preparation is a well-established concept, and the TIME framework has been developed as a practical tool to assist practitioners when assessing and managing patients with wounds. Wound Bed Preparation (WBP) is a paradigm to optimize chronic wound treatment. This holistic approach examines the treatment of the cause and patient-centered concerns to determine whether a wound is healable, a maintenance wound or nonhealing. This session will provide an overview of key changes in the 2021 update of the WBP paradigm designed to facilitate knowledge translation in the clinical setting and improve patient outcomes.

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6:30PM – 7:15PM EST

Auditorium

A “Wound” to the Wise — Practical Tips and Tricks of Wound Care

.75 CME Credits | .75 Contact Hours

The “Wound” to the Wise segment will feature dynamic and short pearls of wisdom from each of the course faculty in the form of practical, digestible takeaways to help you optimize patient care. We invite you to actively be part of the WoundCon agenda as we roll out this new and exciting segment for all future WoundCons. Details to come on how to join the fun and have your “Wound” to the Wise featured during an upcoming WoundCon event.

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