WoundCon Summer 2021 Agenda

Download the WoundCon Summer 2021 Conference Planning Guide or view the Agenda below.

Friday July, 16 2021

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8:00AM – 9:00AM EDT

Auditorium

COVID-19 and Skin Care Update: What Did We Learn?

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Elizabeth Faust, CRNP, CWOCN

COVID-19 quickly progressed to a pandemic causing a rapid shift in health care systems and in how we care for patients. Skin conditions have gained more attention in the past year, with effects on both frontline workers and patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

Frontline workers have endured personal protection equipment–induced skin injuries and hand hygiene–related dermatitis caused by longer hours and increased frequency of hand washing. COVID-19–related skin manifestations have been reported in patients of all ages. Knowledge of these conditions can help in early diagnosis, risk status assessment, and patient triage.

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8:00AM – 9:00AM EDT

Auditorium

The Nuts and Bolts of Cellular and Tissue-Based Products

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Dr. Thomas Serena, MD, FACS

Cellular and/or tissue-based products (CTPs) in wound care include an ever-expanding scope of technologies on the market, including the CTPs formerly known as “skin substitutes” and autologous homologous delivery systems.

Evidence suggests that the use of CTPs accelerates healing in patients with chronic and complex wounds when compared with standard wound care.

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8:00AM – 9:00AM EDT

Auditorium

Managing Diabetic Foot Infection: From Biofilm to Bone

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

James McGuire, DPM, PT, LPed, FAPWHc

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are serious and challenging for patients and health care professionals. Treatment of DFUs can be labor intensive and expensive. The incidence of diabetic foot infections (DFIs) is high.

Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are among the most common complications of DFUs and are frequent causes of hospitalizations, morbidity, and increased risk for lower extremity amputation.

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9:00AM – 10:00AM EDT

Auditorium

Dermatology for the Non-Dermatology Specialist

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D., PhD

Health care providers and clinicians are challenged when it comes to certain dermatologic conditions. Dermatologists focus on health issues affecting the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. Wound care specialists have a master level of knowledge in wound management. Many clinicians have little or no experience in patients with skin conditions.

It is important for clinicians to have a basic understanding of and familiarity with the general principles of common skin conditions, but they must also know when to seek further advice.

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9:00AM – 10:00AM EDT

Auditorium

Newer Techniques of Non-Invasive Vascular Assessment That You Can Use in the Clinic

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Naz Wahab, MD, FAAFP, FAPWCA

Patients with chronic lower limb wounds need a thorough vascular assessment for treatment and management of underlying conditions. This is also a critical step to predict healing, screen for arterial disease, determine revascularization, predict benefit of adjunct therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and assess the risk of amputation.

Non-invasive vascular assessment methods that can be performed in the clinic setting are limited. Evaluating microcirculation and macrocirculation is warranted in patients with lower extremity wounds. Patients with diabetes have more complex vascular anatomy and wider disease distribution, and performing newer techniques of non-invasive vascular assessment during clinic visits is of great benefit.

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9:00AM – 10:00AM EDT

Auditorium

The Utilization of an Autologous Blood Clot Tissue Matrix in the Treatment of Chronic Wounds in Patients with Diabetes

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Robert Snyder, DPM, MSc, CWSP, FFPM, RCPS (Glasg)

Autologous blood clot tissue creates a protective setting for the body to utilize its own mechanisms to enhance and support wound healing in an organized manner as the healing cascade advances. The in vitro blood clot tissue is derived from the patient’s whole blood, where it assists in the wound healing process naturally.

Research shows how autologous blood clots help stimulate healing and facilitate the movement of critical substrates while lowering bioburden and fostering angiogenesis. This process is rapid, and autologous blood clot tissue is applied in wounds of various etiologies such as venous leg ulcers, pressure injuries, and diabetic foot ulcers.

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12:00PM – 1:00PM EDT

Auditorium

Atypical Wounds: Atypical Dermatologic Conditions

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Marco Romanelli, MD, PhD

Atypical dermatologic conditions consist of various skin conditions that are seen infrequently, including rashes, benign lesions, cysts, and tumors. These conditions are skin manifestations that can demonstrate local invasion and/or metastatic potential. Health care professionals should have practical knowledge of general principles in the identification and management of atypical conditions of the skin.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, atypical dermatologic conditions have been observed, with various clinical presentations. Researchers are continuing to develop a better understanding of these unique skin manifestations.

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12:00PM – 1:00PM EDT

Auditorium

The Top 10 Things a Non-Hyperbaric Clinician Needs to Know About HBO Therapy

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Holly Mangrum, PT, DPT, CWS

Health care professionals should have a practical knowledge of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to best help their patients. The health care team should educate patients on the risks and benefits of HBOT and on how to maintain safety during treatment, and the team should also provide coordinated care.

HBOT is an adjunct method for wound healing that uses 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Clinicians should be familiar with approved indications as an overall management strategy in appropriate patients.

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12:00PM – 1:00PM EDT

Auditorium

Troubleshooting Skin Issues With Ostomies

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Janice Colwell, RN, MS, CWOCN, FAAN

Peristomal issues are common in ostomy patients and can be painful and irritating for patients. Identifying peristomal issues early on will help in treatment and result in faster healing. Common peristomal skin complications include moisture-associated skin damage (MASD), fungal MASD, folliculitis, mechanical trauma, pyoderma gangrenosum, allergic reactions, and suture granuloma.

Treating the underlying cause is the goal for full resolution of ostomy skin complications. The underlying cause can be related to factors including weight gain or loss, ostomy appliance fit, diet, etc. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach may help to identify other possible causes of peristomal skin issues.

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2:30PM – 3:30PM EDT

Auditorium

Wounds in Persons with Spinal Cord Injury — Patient and Clinical
Perspectives

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Laurie Rappl, PT, DPT, CWS

Pressure injuries represent a significant burden to patients and clinicians. Patient adherence to prevention and management interventions can be a difficult challenge. Helping patients to understand the necessity of prevention and management strategies can result in better outcomes.

Health care professionals should make it a point to understand their patients’ perspective and experiences to help them have realistic expectations for healing. Patients’ daily activities, lifestyle considerations, and involvement in decision making around pressure injury care are vital aspects that should be included in the plan of care and discussed with the patient.

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2:30PM – 3:30PM EDT

Auditorium

Improving Wound Debridement Through the Use of Advanced Wound Imaging Tools

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Windy Cole, DPM, CWSP

Chronic wounds affect approximately 2-4 million people in the United States each year. Although there are many causes of delayed or stalled healing in wounds, biofilm and the presence of infection are common culprits. To restart healing, biofilm and bioburden must be removed from the wound bed.

Debridement is a commonly employed method of biofilm removal. Recent advances in wound imaging tools can allow for better visualization of the wound bed and more effective debridement, thus helping to establish a better microenvironment for healing.

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2:30PM – 3:30PM EDT

Auditorium

Wound Care in Special Populations: Pediatric Patients

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Ferne Elsass, MSN, RN, CPN, CWON

The general principles of wound care are similar in pediatric patients and adults; however, current guidelines and evidence-based practices are generally geared more toward adults. There are limited studies on the pediatric population because of ethical concerns, and this has resulted in limitations to evidence-based care.

Wound care in pediatric populations should include a treatment regimen that manages pain and anxiety, considers neurodevelopmental status, and facilitates wound healing.

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5:30PM – 6:30PM EDT

Auditorium

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Optimizing Healing Across the Continuum

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Julie Rivera, MSN, RN-BC, CWOCN

Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an advanced wound care treatment modality that has been shown to assist in wound healing for various hard-to-heal wound types. The ability of NPWT to manage wounds, reduce exudate, and promote new tissue and perfusion facilitates optimized healing across the continuum.

Practical knowledge of principles, indications, contraindications, and specific device instructions for NPWT will ensure better outcomes across the continuum. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team-based approach, combined with patient and staff education about NPWT, will support patients through their transition across care settings.

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5:30PM – 6:30PM EDT

Auditorium

Non-Cytotoxic Wound Cleansers – Is There Anything Better Than Saline?

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Catherine Milne, APRN, MSN, ANP/ACNS-BC, CWOCN-AP

Clinicians have a long list to choose from when selecting a wound cleansing agent. Many of these agents are claimed to be able to remove foreign bodies and debris from the wound bed surface; however, there are many cytotoxic agents that are harmful to wound tissue and slow down the healing process.

Non-cytotoxic wound cleansers help manage bacteria levels and are safe to tissues in the wound bed. Effective wound cleansers should be non-cytotoxic and should cleanse, moisten, and facilitate the debridement of foreign bodies, debris, and microorganisms.

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5:30PM – 6:30PM EDT

Auditorium

The Role of Inflammation and Oxygen Free Radicals in Wound Healing

1.00 CME Credits | 1.00 Contact Hours

Chandan Sen, PhD

The defensive immune response that is communicated by the host against foreign pathogens is inflammation. Inflammation occurs after injury and produces reactive oxygen species resulting from the high degree of phagocytosis. As wound healing occurs and progresses, cell proliferation and migrations begin in response to the redox signaling of reactive oxygen species.

Chronic inflammation produces an abundance of oxygen free radicals, thereby creating an increase in inflammation. This vicious cycle can cause further damage in other systems in the body. Oxygen free radicals are known to be involved in the development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

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